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WHEN DOES A ‘SNUG’ EQUAL A ‘WARM HUG’? BY NIKKI HOFFMAN

Angel Snugs

Angel Snugs.org

Looking to keep that blissful feeling of gratitude and love all year long? Angel Snugs is a perfect solution! Harbor Hills resident and friend Bobbie Powell started our local group four years ago. Since then, this 501 (c)(3) has grown along with three flourishing Angel Snugs groups from The Villages.

Angel Snugs was started in 2006 in Sanford by Angi Farrugia. Today, talented men and women put their crochet, looming and knitting skills to good use. The groups create imaginative hats for children undergoing radiation, chemotherapy and other oncology procedures. Hats are sent to 82 hospitals covering 32 states, Canada and Mexico. Twelve Florida hospitals regularly receive these hats or “snugs”. The children choose their own hats and the most imaginative snugs are in demand. Envision a hat with yarn fashioned as a pony tail, curly worms or Mickey and Minnie Mouse! A remarkable 210 snugs, headbands and scarves crafted as snowmen, Grinches, and Christmas trees arrived in hospitals in time for this holiday. To date, 72,000 snugs and accessories have been sent to pediatric oncology units.

Have a caring heart but only a half hour a week to spare? Volunteers can create a loomed hat in thirty minutes. The group of men and women meet at Water Oak Clubhouse on the second and fourth Wednesdays from 1-4PM. Patterns, yarn and help are free and available to help new members create that first “snug” or warm hug. Just give your name at the gate and say “Angel Snugs.” Please join us.

Bobbie’s message is heartfelt. “This is a wonderful opportunity to make a difference and bring smiles to a children’s oncology ward.” Yarn donations are appreciated. Call Bobbie at 352-678-5679 or visit angelsnugs.org.

THE NEW YEAR IS IN FULL SWING AT HARBOR HILLS BY NIKKI HOFFMAN

Happy New Year Harbor Hills

Happy New Year Harbor Hills

English anthropologist Jane Goodall provides a thoughtful quote for the New Year. “You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” The New Year offers us a fresh start, closing one chapter and starting a new one. And as caring seniors, we have the opportunity to make our actions count every day.

On January 6th, Harbor Hills welcomes 2020 with friendship and fun on Mingling Monday. Members gather in the lounge from 5:30 – 7:30 PM. Drink specials are served along with a complimentary taste of something exceptional for the New Year.

David and I never miss Pasta Night! On January 17th, delight in live entertainment and your choice of tasty pastas, sauces and toppings. Member and non-members are invited. Call for reservations at 352-753-7000. Monday, January 20 is our Meet A Neighbor, Bring A Neighbor event.  Members enjoy drink specials, live entertainment and a gourmet burger buffet.

Wondering about the results of December’s Festival of Lights parade? Sixty-seven decorated golf carts wound their way through tree-lined streets on a soggy Harbor Hills evening. Bruce and Cindy Chancellor started us off with eggnog. Treats were provided by the Neeses. The parade concluded at the home of Theresa Morris with a warm fireplace and comfort food. Best decorated cart was awarded to Don and January Maloney. Raymond and Rebecca Durbin won best overall home. Thanks to all who participated!

Be grateful for what we have. Have a more lighthearted approach to all things. Laughter and joy are an effective prescription for happiness. From our community to yours, Happy New Year, 2020!

Shrimp Scampi By Pete R. Steriti Harbor Hills Member

Boston once was a thriving fishing port accommodating fleets of fishing boats.  Boats arrived daily to unload and process their catches for distribution. Locals could purchase their seafoods direct.  Salespeople always recognized mom and me. They always were generous with prices and portions. It was worth the long walk.  Being a Catholic community, in those days, eating meat was forbidden on Fridays.  Every Friday, a seafood vendor setup his pushcart business on Salem and Prince streets.  Shrimp, squid, and cod were covered with chipped ice and sold.  Shrimp was a delicacy and were pricey.  Mom only bought shrimp on special occasions.  She usually served them over linguini with a red sauce or with my very favorite, shrimp scampi.             

Shrimp Scampi

Whether served as a stand-alone appetizer, a main course served over risotto or polenta, tossed with linguini (below), baked in individual phyllo triangles, scampi flatbread, or baked in puff pastry, Shrimp Scampi is incredibly versatile.  This Scampi recipe also is remarkably quick and easy to make, and all applications equally delicious. 

Scampi sauce is prepared in a single pot.  When ready, raw shrimp is coated in sauce, and quick broiled.

  

This is a perfectly proportioned recipe for scampi sauce; garlic, scallions, lemon, salted butter, and olive oil, lightly seasoned with salt and pepper.  It balances perfectly with flavorful wild caught shrimp.

Scampi appetizer can be served buffet style or individually plated.  

Sauce ingredients are prepared in only one pot.  Shrimp is coated in the sauce pot and quick broiled on both sides on a cookie sheet.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4-pounds large wild-caught shrimp

Scampi Sauce

  • 1 quarter pound of salted butter, one stick
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped scallions
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
  • Few grinds each of salt and pepper
  • Crostini, optional
  • Chopped Italian flat leaf parsley, lemon wedges

Directions:

  • Remove shrimp shells, with or without tail section left on (I prefer off) and devein.  Rinse in cold water and pat dry. Set them aside.
  • In a pot, large enough to comfortably hold all shrimp and sauce, melt the butter over low heat.  Add olive oil, lemon juice, scallions, garlic, salt, and pepper. Set aside. 
  • Pre-heat the broiler.  Coat shrimp in sauce. Place them in rows on a rimmed cookie sheet large enough to accommodate a single layer.  Line shrimp in rows. Spoon the scampi sauce over shrimp.  
  • Broil them close to the heat for about three minutes or until the tops are partly pink but not cooked through.  Flip them over and broil briefly until just cooked through. Try not to overcook them.
  • Arrange Scampi and sauce on a serving platter or directly on individual plates, crostini optional.  Serve. 

Pasta and Shrimp Scampi

Ingredients:

  • Shrimp Scampi (above) 
  • ½ pound linguini
  • Optional, garnish with chopped parsley

Directions:

  • Prepare Scampi sauce as shown above.   
  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a rapid boil.  Add pasta. While cooking, preheat broiler. Coat shrimp and layer them on the cookie sheet with remaining sauce as discussed above.      
  • Once linguini is cooked al dente, strain and return pasta to the empty pot.  
  • Coat and broil shrimp per above. 
  • Carefully pour entire contents of the scampi tray, shrimp, juices, and bits, in the pasta pot with linguini.  Toss and serve. Garnish.
  • Here are some other options.  Full recipes are on my website

 

Buon Appetito

 

About the Author

Peter grew up in Boston’s Italian North End.  His website, www.LuciaTramonte.com, is dedicated to his Mom.  Lucia Tramonte was her maiden name.

‘CAUSES TO CARE ABOUT’ TAKE CENTER STAGE BY NIKKI HOFFMAN

Treat The Troops

Treat The Troops

As our Northern friends and family bundle up with boots and wool caps, we are grateful for December days of Florida sunshine and easy breezes. And as seniors, we now have the time and the heart to care about others.

The Harbor Hills Ladies Charity reached record proportions with their recent Treat the Troops cookie drive. This year, 1,050 dozen cookies (12,600 cookies) in 131 boxes were sent to our deployed troops. The team effort included overwhelming support received from the residents of The Villages. Thank you! Our soldiers send heartfelt messages of gratitude from the field daily.

Major Mark O’Neill is the son of Harbor Hills resident Yves Mumley.  O’Neill did two tours of duty, serving one year in Iraq and one year in Afghanistan. Yves explained that their home was full of Christmas scents and sounds; cookies in the oven, freshly cut pine, ornaments jingling on the tree. “These packages,” Major O’Neill said, “give us a temporary moment to relive those memories when we are so far from home, friends and families.”

Stop by the Harbor Hills tennis courts any Friday and you will see our tennis players showing their support for our troops in a special way. Steve Stephens, USMC, adapted the idea from the Marine Corps League in The Villages. Every Friday, players wear red in honor of our deployed American soldiers. RED has become an acronym that stands for Remember Everyone Deployed. The US Marine Corps Reserve also sponsors the Toys for Tots program. To help kids in our area, Steve placed a Toys for Tots box near the courts. Let’s fill it up with new unwrapped toys for Christmas! #makeitmagical

Junior Tennis Lessons

 

Junior Tennis

Junior Tennis Club

Tennis is a high skill level sport!  It requires constant growth with instruction and practice, like so many lifelong skills, best achieved at an early age.  Skills learned in tennis can be successfully carried over to just about any other sport and activity!  Additionally, many very important elements of growth depend on confidence, identification, and self esteem which tennis skills certainly provide. These days the children are comparing themselves and playing sports as early as elementary school, while the foundation of high school teams are established by junior high!  My goal is to provide these sessions during the school year to give the children a head start for an athletic advantage at a young age.  Please encourage your children to stay involved and sign up for as many sessions as possible!There is not enough space for me to express how proud I am of every junior for each individual skilled learned.  I am truly blessed for the opportunity to share one of my greatest passions with them!  Thank you!  I am looking forward to another incredible year of Junior Lessons in 2020.

Wishing you and your family a Wonderful Holiday and a Healthy New Year.

Sincerely,

John C. Natolly – USPTA Elite Tennis Professional

Director of Racquet Sports
Harbor Hills Country Club
352.753.9376 Office

HOT RODS AT HARBOR HILLS COUNTRY CLUB BY NIKKI HOFFMAN

What do these iconic movies have in common? Thunder Road, 1958; American Graffiti, 1973; Smokey and the Bandit, 1977; The Blues Brothers, 1980 and Gran Torino, 2008? They are some of the best-known displays of American muscle cars in film history! Some may argue that Steve McQueen, Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynolds took a ‘back seat’ to these classic cars that quickly gained prominence with the American public.

Ohio native Sam Metro can tell you all about the history of muscle cars, hot rods and most classics on four wheels. He’s been hosting vintage car shows for ten years. “It  started with my interest in hot rods and grew into a passion for all sorts of specialty vehicles.” Sam explains that America’s fascination with hot rods originated with soldiers returning from World War II. Looking for excitement and speed, they sought out bigger and more powerful engines for their vehicles.

1965 to 1973 were the golden years of muscle cars. Anyone who liked to drive fast wanted a car with muscle. Hot rodders took basic cars and installed big engines in them. Manufacturers noticed and responded. And so, the muscle car was born!

This Saturday, Harbor Hills Country Club is hosting a fabulous show of hot rods, custom cars, muscle cars, antique and specialty vehicles and you are invited! Live music and entertainment will be provided by WJBJ Cruisin’ With The Classics. Admission and parking is complimentary. Food will be available for purchase. Meet Sam and other specialty car owners from 11AM to 3PM. To show your vehicle, contact Sam at 352-449-9732 or motor up to beautiful Harbor Hills. Fans of the 1991 movie Thelma and Louise just might see a 1966 Thunderbird cruise in!

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